woman giving a presentation

 

From Forbes,  Carmine Gallo shares his insights into the 5 Public-Speaking Tips TED Gives Its Speakers.   Carmine offers these great recommendations:

Make Eye Contact, Right From The Start…

Show Vulnerability…

Make ‘Em Laugh—But Not Squirm…

Park Your Ego…

Tell A Story

Nearly every great TED talk begins with a story, and there’s a good reason why they do. Stories are irresistible. “Stories helped make us who we are… we love hearing stories and stories probably helped shape how our minds share and receive information,” Anderson writes.

In my own analysis of 500 TED talks I discovered that some of the most viral presentations were comprised of 65% to 72% story, or what Aristotle called “pathos.” Whether it’s Bryan Stevensonarguing for equal justice, or Sheryl Sandberg recommending that women “lean in” to the workplace, or Ken Robinson exposing the failures in our educational system, the talks we remember are memorable because the ideas are presented in narrative form.

According to Anderson, “The stories that can generate the best connection are stories about you personally or about people close to you. Tales of failure, awkwardness, misfortune, danger, or disaster, told authentically, are often the moment when listeners shift from plain vanilla interest to deep engagement.”

Read the full story at 5 Public-Speaking Tips TED Gives Its Speakers

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